Frankie Clothing GETTINGBACKTOSQUAREONE Women wearing ‘traditional’ clothing in Australia’s first ‘gender neutral’ clothing campaign

Women wearing ‘traditional’ clothing in Australia’s first ‘gender neutral’ clothing campaign

Today, women’s underwear, undergarments, and even dresses are changing the way we look at women’s bodies.

It’s an exciting time for fashion, and it’s also a time to celebrate women’s liberation.

A new trend is emerging: a fashion movement where women’s clothes and accessories are seen as an extension of their gender identity.

This has been dubbed ‘gender-neutral’ clothing.

“There’s nothing wrong with saying women wear underwear and dresses,” says Sophie O’Connor, a designer, author and curator of fashion and lifestyle, who is also the founder of the womenswear boutique, The Frugal Girl.

“It’s just a question of what the intention is.”

“We’re all the same, so what’s the difference?” says Ms O’Brien, who grew up in the city of Melbourne in Melbourne, Australia, where the idea of ‘women’s clothing’ was coined by the Victorian politician, Victorian Prime Minister and First Lady, Elizabeth Bleakley.

Fashion designers Sophie O. O’Conner and Sarah O’Connell, from Melbourne, have been producing ‘gender non-binary’ clothing for more than three years. “

I have a lot of friends who are gender non-conforming people and I think it’s a very important issue for them.”

Fashion designers Sophie O. O’Conner and Sarah O’Connell, from Melbourne, have been producing ‘gender non-binary’ clothing for more than three years.

Photo: Supplied The Australian Society of Fashion Designers & Managers (ASFMD) is one of the largest organisations representing fashion designers and has endorsed gender neutral clothing for the past 10 years.

Its executive director, Dr Elizabeth Bleekley, says the goal of this movement is to make clothes that are as inclusive as possible.

“We’ve got this really strong, diverse community of designers who are all coming together to support the cause,” Dr Bleekly says.

“In the past, we’ve been told that gender neutral was a new thing and we were going to be so out of touch.

But the industry has actually changed.

We are all the product of our bodies and the fashion world is changing as well.”

The ASFMD says there is a need for more women’s fashion brands.

Photo of Sophie OConnor: Sarah OConnell, founder of The Fungi & Women’s Clothing, says a lack of visibility of women’s design in the fashion industry has been a huge challenge.

The ASMD also has a range of other gender neutral products that are available online, in stores and in select fashion boutiques. “

Women’s fashion is very much seen as a feminine thing and the idea that we are wearing dresses and shoes is seen as very much feminine,” she says.

The ASMD also has a range of other gender neutral products that are available online, in stores and in select fashion boutiques.

“Some people have a very negative opinion of gender neutral, so I think we have to embrace that,” Dr O’Connors says.

There’s a lot more women in the business than we think.

Dr Bleakleys daughter, Sophie, is a fashion designer who says she wants to be an independent woman.

She also wants to encourage other women to join the fashion movement.

“For me, it’s about empowering and supporting the women who are doing this work,” she said.

“My daughter is the first in her family to go to university.

I believe in equality and being open minded.”

It’s very exciting for me to see the women of colour and Indigenous women get involved.

Ms OConnor says she hopes to continue supporting women’s and gender non gender-conformist fashion in Australia. “

The fashion industry in Australia is very progressive, and the ASMMD is a very vocal and progressive voice,” Dr Cleary says.

Ms OConnor says she hopes to continue supporting women’s and gender non gender-conformist fashion in Australia.

“If there’s one thing I learned in the last year, it is that it’s not just about me,” she tells the ABC.

A lot of people are doing a lot to support us, but we are not doing it because we think we’re doing it for us.”